13 thoughts on “Poland Spring’s Missed Green Marketing Opportunity: A Discussion of Their New Eco-Sense Bottle

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  3. As toni above mentions, #7BPA plastics are bad news. (See Science News: http://bit.ly/akeS2v ) Until we have serious deposits required on plastic and glass containers, the USA will continue to have landfill and litter issues. Having said all that, the move to using less plastic in containers is less expensive for corporations. As long as an economic incentive is there, corporations will herd in that direction. Your request that the “eco” logo come with an explanation is a valid and terrific action; like “organic” logos a few years back, logos like that are worthless without accountability and verification.

  4. The new Poland Spring eco-sense bottles have been changed quietly from polycarbonate to #1 PETE plastic, which is the same as small water bottles. I suspect they are quietly trying to phase out their BPA-leaching polycarbonate bottles without admitting that there’s anything wrong with them, which is why they are not marketing the bottle change in any way and have limited information.

    #1 is clearly better than #7 because PC is the absolute worst for BPA, but many people say #1 should only be used once then recycled — Poland Spring is saying they are going to recycle these many times. Still not good.

  5. Better than #7 being used many times though. I’m glad they made the switch. I’ve been trying to steer clear of plastics and recently switched to a stainless steel drinking container. What good does that do if the source of the water comes from a #7 container with all kinds of things leaching into it anyway! At least #1 is a step forward.

  6. One of the many criticisms of 5-gallon jug water cooler offerings has been the composition of the plastic.

    A big bottle like this isn’t very durable – and may not be adequately rigid for use – unless it’s polycarbonate. Polycarbonate, (#7 in the little triangle), does indeed rely heavily on BPA, a key hardening agent for many plastics, primarily found in #3 and #7.

    BPA is considered an endocrine disruptor – an “artificial hormone” – and has been linked in a number of studies to cancer, diabetes, heart disease, and you name it. It has been banned for use in baby bottles in a number of US states, Canada, and is under intense scrutiny in Europe. The US FDA and EPA have it solidly on their RADAR, and the US Congress has unsuccessfully attempted bill passage to ban it’s use nationally twice now.

    BPA has been demonstrated to leach from bottles into water, particularly when hot (a delivery truck, many storage facilities).

    Nestle Waters lineup, including Deer Park, Poland Spring, and many others, have switched to “BPA-free” bottles in many cases.

    So, the essence of an “Eco-Sense” bottle is that it is now less poisonous to users.

    From a landfill perspective, although Nestle claims it’s “easier to recycle”, the softer bottle will now last through fewer refill cycles. Which means more bottles will be disposed of. Since 80% of plastic bottles end up in landfill regardless of their recyclability, we know where these are headed.

  7. BPA is considered an endocrine disruptor – an “artificial hormone” – and has been linked in a number of studies to cancer, diabetes, heart disease, and you name it. It has been banned for use in baby bottles in a number of US states, Canada, and is under intense scrutiny in Europe. The US FDA and EPA have it solidly on their RADAR, and the US Congress has unsuccessfully attempted bill passage to ban it’s use nationally twice now.

    BPA has been demonstrated to leach from bottles into water, particularly when hot (a delivery truck, many storage facilities).

    Nestle Waters lineup, including Deer Park, Poland Spring, and many others, have switched to “BPA-free” bottles in many cases.

    So, the essence of an “Eco-Sense” bottle is that it is now less poisonous to users.

    From a landfill perspective, although Nestle claims it’s “easier to recycle”, the softer bottle will now last through fewer refill cycles. Which means more bottles will be disposed of. Since 80% of plastic bottles end up in landfill regardless of their recyclability, we know where these are headed.”

    Saul Tarzi, Quench USA
    http://www.quenchonline.com
    (888) 554-2782 ext. 1410

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